Using the Groundswell to Your Advantage

This blog is a response to chapter 11 of the groundswell textbook called “how connecting with the groundswell transforms your company” for my MARK4474 course.

Sidenote: I finally got my hands on the latest edition of the groundswell textbook! I wish all of my textbooks cost $15! 🙂

Chapter 11 gave a few examples of how companies used the groundswell as a marketing vehicle. One great example is a video called, “Dove Evolution” which became a viral success in 2006. Currently it has over 17 million views on YouTube. Check out the video below!

The video caused a surge of traffic to Dove’s Campaign For Real Beauty website, which is more than double what their 2006 Super Bowl ad drove. The 30-sec Super Bowl ad cost Dove $2.5 million, whereas the cost of uploading the “Dove Evolution” video on YouTube was zero (Li & Bernoff, 2011, pp. 216). This shows the power of the groundswell, and how companies can use it to their advantage!

Another company that comes to mind and shows creativity when using the groundswell is Old Spice. The videos they post to YouTube are hilarious, and their campaigns are interactive. My favorite is when Wolf Dog took over as the new chief director of marketing for Old Spice. They created him to promote Old Spice’s new Wild Collection Cologne. From what I can remember, they conducted interviews with people who applied to be Wolf Dog’s assistant, and people could ask him questions and he’d respond via live chat – the amount of interaction in this digital campaign was unreal. And it was hilarious. You can read more about it here. Unfortunately, all of the YouTube videos regarding Wolf Dog are now set to private.

How can a company prepare for transformation to repeat the success that Dove had? (Or Old Spice?)

  • Start small. Change takes time. Start small, see what works and go from there.
  • Educate your executives. Get executives to use the technology, and maybe start using the tools internally to show the value.
  • Get the right people to run your strategy. Get someone who is passionate or interested in starting a relationship with customers.
  • Get your agency and technology partners in sync. Get them to invest time and resources, so everyone is on the same page.
  • Plan for the next step and for the long term. Nothing much more to say here (Li & Bernoff, 2011, pp. 230).

The company I have been looking at in for my activities/blogs, the Alberta Motor Association, has been dipping their feet into the water that is the groundswell. Here is quick look at what they are doing:

  • Facebook: 19k likes. Post updates on where AMA is at (ex. sponsorship events), reminders, news about Alberta (ex. flood watch) and share blogs.
  • Twitter: 1.2k followers. An account focused on AMA in the community. Tweets reminders about events, car care, etc.
  • Blogs: AMA creates content that is shared via Facebook, and an Newsletter. This content is seasonally relevant, and also shows the value of an AMA membership.
  • YouTube: 175 subscribers. Not much going on here. Just a few commercials posted, and a few other videos. None of them have gone “viral.”

AMA so far has started out small in each area, and has done many things that other companies are already doing. They are listening and responding to people on social media, and writing blogs about content that members may be interested in. In order to excel more in the groundswell, they may need to invest more time and resources to see better results including more likes, shares and interactions with people in the groundswell. I am sure there are many ways AMA can show that they are “practically family” by using the groundswell.

-B.


Bibliography

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2011). Groundswell. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press

Advertisements