Can you hear me now?

This blog is a response to chapter 6 of the groundswell textbook called “talking with the groundswell” for my MARK4474 course.

Everyday, people are bombarded with marketing messages. Commercials, billboards, posters, signage, web ads, flyers, direct mail – the list goes on. Every company is SHOUTING, wanting their message to be heard. WHEN EVERYONE IS TALKING TO YOU LIKE THIS IT IS EASY TO IGNORE THEM. But, when a company talks to you, whether it be one-to-one or a message to a group of people, it kind of makes you want to listen. It’s interesting.

While advertising (SHOUTING) creates awareness about a product/service to consumers, talking to people about their opinions or even reading a stranger’s reviews on a product online greatly affect if the consumer will buy or not. Marketers call this a “marketing funnel” which follows the path of a consumer during their decision making process from start to finish.

Customers in the middle of the funnel are engaged in conversations on blogs, in discussion forums, and in social networks. Your company can participate in these places, but shouting doesn’t work. Conversations do.” (Li & Bernoff, 2011, p. 102)

A great example that the textbook uses is Blendtech, which is known for their “Will it Blend” YouTube videos. Via the company’s  blog, they let people know when and where they can see a blender demonstration, and they also invited people to suggest different items to try and blend in their YouTube videos (Li & Bernoff, 2011, p. 102). One of my personal favorites is when they blend a bunch of glowsticks! Blendtech understands that they must talk to their customers, as well as listen and respond to them – and not constantly SHOUT.

 

There are a few different techniques for talking with the groundswell, they include:

  • Posting a video online, and letting people share it (aka “go viral”)
    • Creating a viral video is best for creating awareness
  • Engage in social media websites
    • Social networks helps spread word of mouth about your company
  • Start a blog
    • Blogs help solve the problem of having a complicated message (ex. complex products and services)
  • Create a community
    • Creating a community allows a company to move the conversation to a place where you can participate (Li & Bernoff, 2011, p. 103, 124-125)

When looking at the company I’ve been discussing in my blogs, the Alberta Motor Association, they are talking via both social media and blogs. Like previously mentioned, they have a Facebook page where respond to members posts, ask them questions and post relevant information related to AMA and Alberta. And with the relaunch of the AMA website, they started producing blog content. I think that AMA started to produce and talk via blogs to help solve the problem of having a complicated message.

AMA has so many products and services to offer and that the message can be a bit confusing. Of course, AMA wants members to know and feel that being a member is rewarding. Members can take advantage of AMA’s registry services, travel agency, insurance, and as a member, you can get discounts at places all across Alberta and around the world! Of course, most people get the membership for roadside assistance. However, it is important for members to know that their membership can also do so much more. If a member doesn’t use roadside assistance for some time, they may feel like it’s a waste of money. I think this is why AMA producing blogs is so important – so they can communicate and talk to members about everything AMA has to offer, as well as show that they are practically family, by posting blogs about topics that matter to Albertans.

-B.


Bibliography

Li, C., & Bernoff, J. (2011). Groundswell. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press.

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